The Least Controversial Road to Self-Improvement Rocket Fuel

No comments

Sometimes I like to dabble in controversy.

Partly because it’s useful. There are a lot of wrong ideas floating around out there. It pays to stir the cage and kick the pot. If it creates attention, then so much the better.

And partly because it’s fun. If you want to get better at refining, communicating and defending your ideas, summon controversy.

I’m going to skip that for this article.

Because what I’m about to describe is the least controversial approach to self-improvement imaginable.

(It’s still useful to hear, though.)

Are you ready?

It goes a little something like this:

If you want to improve as a person, you should… improve… as a person.

And the gasps echo around the dusty hall…

Or not.

Okay okay, hardly stellar advice. There’s nothing less informative than a logical tautology.

But here’s why that’s useful.

Some folk hear that and scream “yes! That’s the point! Tell me how!”

If you’re one of them, I don’t blame you.

But you might be overthinking things a little.

If you want to know how, you’ve set the benchmark too high. Any improvement at all will do.

Yes, it’s great to set high standards for yourself. Keep cultivating that – a desire to transcend your limitations will serve you well, my friend.

But if you’re stuck, it’s not helping you right now.

So let’s put it aside for the moment, knowing full well you’ll come back to it soon.

If you want to improve, then improve. Any amount will do, and any topic will do. No need to be fussy or particular.

What hobby have you always wanted to master?

Or what skill do you think would transform your career or business?

Now’s the time to dust that off and give it a go.

It’ll help you in the long run. Learning a hobby or skill teaches you more than the skill. It teaches you how to learn in general. It encourages you to stick with a project and do something for the fun of it.

And who knows – if you’re creative or lucky, you’ll find a use for it later.

There’s an even better reason to learn a hobby, though:

If it’s the right hobby, it’ll inspire you.

And inspiration is pure, high-octane, military grade self-improvement fuel.

It’ll make everything you do so much easier and more effective.

The best part?

It’s portable. Becoming inspired in one part of your life elevates every part of your life.

So if you needed an excuse to pursue something fun for a change, that’s it.

You’re welcome.

You can begin that simple self-improvement technique now.

And enjoy its benefits for the rest of your life.

If you really want to take your mind to new places? To improve more you dreamed possible?

You might want to read about this mind training program:

guided-thought.com/monster

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.